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Creatures, Cryptids, and Legends of the States (Pt. 7)

Florida and Hawaii

We start to take a look at the warm, tropical climates of two of the more popular states, Florida and Hawaii. With these exotic states come some fascinating creatures and legends as well. 

Florida: The Skunk Ape

That's right, another bigfoot creature that haunts a state. This bigfoot, often referred to as the Skunk Ape, is a dark-skinned creature with light fur, and the unmistakable odor that gave this creature its name. Most sightings were reported in the 1960s and the 1970s, often seen running on two legs through suburban neighborhoods in Dade County. Many believe that people mistake it for a bear or the other various wildlife that live in the area, and this Bigfoot is the most considered to be a hoax.

Dave Shealy saw the Skunk Ape when he was ten years old in 1974 when he came across the large footprints with his brother. They were out hunting in the woods when they saw the creature walking across the swap, viewing it briefly before it ran into the woods and out of sight. From that point on, Shealy researched and tracked the creature, becoming the state's expert on the Skunk Ape.

The Devil's Chair

Also called Satan's Throne, The Devil's Chair is a popular tourist attraction in Cassadaga. The town is considered haunted, especially in this rundown cemetery. The graves there have been around since the 1800s. The chair was built by a senior man who used it to sit and visit his wife every day, but it has also drawn the attention of otherworldly visitors. The cemetery is often said to be full of shadow figures that lurk in the dark and block people from entering the resting ground.

The chair has little foliage growing around it, and fresh footsteps will appear in the ground every morning. One legend of the Devil's Chair is that if you sit on the chair at midnight, the Devil will come up and talk to you, hearing voices in your head that will stop after you stand up and move away from the chair. Another popular legend is if you place a sealed beer on the chair and left it overnight, in the morning, the can will be empty, yet it will still be sealed.

One thought of why this legend started was to scare children and vandals from the cemetery and prevent the old gravestones from being desecrated by people.

Hawaii: Menehune

These are an ancient group of mischevious little people that lived in the forests and valleys of the Hawaiian islands. They are as big as two feet tall and as small as six inches tall, fitting in the palm of a person's hand. They are said to use their magic arrows to shoot into the heart of angry people make them feel love instead.

They are brilliant and crafty, they are rarely seen by humans, and are credited for feats of engineering and overnight construction. They built temples, fishponds, roads, canoes, and houses. Legend says they created the Menehune Ditch, which was a historic irrigation ditch that funnels water from the Waimea River to Kauai. They are responsible for the overnight creation of the Alekoko Fishpond.

While they seem to like helping people, if they are caught building, they will abandon their work and run and hide, never to return to their project. 

Night Marchers

These are deadly ghosts of ancient Hawaiian warriors that appear on nights honoring Hawaiian Gods or Kanaloa. They march from sunset to sunrise in large groups to sacred places. They are normal-sized warriors, dressed for battle, carrying spears, and blowing horns and beating on drums to signal their arrival. They are said to be suspended in the air and leave no evidence of their visitations.

When humans hear their drums and horns and smell their death odor, they are told to go to their homes immediately and lay flat on the floor. This shows respect, fear, and deference. If you dare to protect yourself, go inside, or look upon them, you will be killed violently for disrespecting them. 

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Creatures, Cryptids, and Legends of the States (Pt. 7)
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